Me Before You (Me Before You, #1)

*This review contains spoilers*

So let’s get started, shall we?

The first thing you should know is it’s very rare that I give a book one star because I can usually find SOMETHING enjoyable about it.
But, that’s not the case here. There were absolutely no redeeming qualities in this book for me.

In fact, there were a total of two points (and by points I mean singular lines) in this book where I genuinely liked what was said. The first was when Treena said, “Oh, for Christ’s sake, Lou. For once in y

So let’s get started, shall we?

The first thing you should know is it’s very rare that I give a book one star because I can usually find SOMETHING enjoyable about it.
But, that’s not the case here. There were absolutely no redeeming qualities in this book for me.

In fact, there were a total of two points (and by points I mean singular lines) in this book where I genuinely liked what was said. The first was when Treena said, “Oh, for Christ’s sake, Lou. For once in your life, just get a grip” (Page 347) and the second was when Louisa said, “It’s not my decision, Mum. It’s Will’s,” (Page 350). Both of which, I had been screaming for the ENTIRE DURATION OF THE BOOK.

Apart from those two lines, everything else about this book made want to tear my hair out.

First, let’s talk about the writing.
Before I started reading, I was under the impression that this book had “beautiful” prose, because that’s what I’d heard from countless people. What I would consider “beautiful” writing (i.e. The Night Circus, Ava Lavender, Ari and Dante) is the type of writing that resonates with and is breathlessly easy to follow. But what I got in this book were gems like: “I could have looked at his face all night. The way his eyes wrinkled at the corners. That place where his neck met his shoulder.” (Page 265).
“That place where his neck met his shoulder”
Someone please explain to me what that means????
Also add in a few “I let out a breath I didn’t know I was holding”s and you can basically sum up the writing in this book.
Point being, I was bored, it elicited no emotion from me, and I had to drag myself through each chapter.

The characters? They were all insufferable.
Will is a moody, brooding, bitter ass who stays a moody, brooding, bitter ass until the very end. Of course he’s also rich, handsome, stubborn, and loves literature and all aspects of “high culture” society. The perfect recipe for your stereotypical heartthrob.
Louisa is a 26 year old woman who has no motivation to do anything with her life until a man comes in and ~*~changes her~*~
Oh and then of course you have to add in a little dash of sexual assault to make your main character more interesting because, you know, you can’t have a good book without THAT.

Now let’s address the unbearable plot. This whole book is based around the ridiculous premise that Louisa is trying to find a way to “save” Will by giving him a reason to live. It’s essentially 369 pages of Louisa, an able bodied person, who decides that SHE knows when a disabled person is ready to die. Only to “learn” that she doesn’t have the right to make that decision and he’s just gonna die anyway. So you’re left reading a book that can only have one possible ending. If this was supposed to be a story about Louisa learning that she was wrong… shouldn’t the reader learn with her? Because you don’t.
You know from the very beginning exactly how the book is going to end. Talk about predictability.

Also I will just briefly mention that while I do think that making a commentary on physician assisted suicide is important and it’s a topic that deserves discussion, I don’t think that this was the best or most productive way to go about it. Overall I think it did more harm than good to use it as a plot device in a book that’s marketed as a romance novel.

Were you waiting for my thoughts on the ableism? Here you go.
First off, as an able bodied person, I know my place and I’m not going to try to speak on behalf of anyone or pretend to know more about the issue than I do. That being said, I’m still going to call this book out for the ableist themes it perpetuates.
The whole message of this book is that no matter what lengths someone goes for you, how much love, wealth, or support you have, living a disabled life is so unbearable that the only thing to do is to kill yourself. Do with that what you will, but nothing about that message is right or okay in my eyes.
But again, I am speaking only from my perspective. So here are a couple of links to articles written by disabled people about their thoughts on the ableism in this book:

http://www.dominickevans.com/2016/02/…

https://crippledscholar.wordpress.com…

Honestly the only thing about this book that made me cry was how painful it was to keep reading. I NEVER DNF books, yet I was SO close to putting this one down. But I just couldn’t do it because I wanted to be able to talk about it in its entirety.

So there you have it. All of my thoughts on this wildly popular, well loved book. So much for going to see the movie.

*This review contains spoilers*So let’s get started, shall we?The first thing you should know is it’s very rare that I give a book one star because I can usually find SOMETHING enjoyable about it.But, that’s not the case here. There were absolutely no redeeming qualities in this book for me.In fact, there were a total of two points (and by points I mean singular lines) in this book where I genuinely liked what was said. The first was when Treena said, “Oh, for Christ’s sake, Lou. For once in your life, just get a grip” (Page 347) and the second was when Louisa said, “It’s not my decision, Mum. It’s Will’s,” (Page 350). Both of which, I had been screaming for the ENTIRE DURATION OF THE BOOK.Apart from those two lines, everything else about this book made want to tear my hair out.First, let’s talk about the writing.Before I started reading, I was under the impression that this book had “beautiful” prose, because that’s what I’d heard from countless people. What I would consider “beautiful” writing (i.e. The Night Circus, Ava Lavender, Ari and Dante) is the type of writing that resonates with and is breathlessly easy to follow. But what I got in this book were gems like: “I could have looked at his face all night. The way his eyes wrinkled at the corners. That place where his neck met his shoulder.” (Page 265).”That place where his neck met his shoulder”Someone please explain to me what that means????Also add in a few “I let out a breath I didn’t know I was holding”s and you can basically sum up the writing in this book.Point being, I was bored, it elicited no emotion from me, and I had to drag myself through each chapter.The characters? They were all insufferable.Will is a moody, brooding, bitter ass who stays a moody, brooding, bitter ass until the very end. Of course he’s also rich, handsome, stubborn, and loves literature and all aspects of “high culture” society. The perfect recipe for your stereotypical heartthrob.Louisa is a 26 year old woman who has no motivation to do anything with her life until a man comes in and ~*~changes her~*~Oh and then of course you have to add in a little dash of sexual assault to make your main character more interesting because, you know, you can’t have a good book without THAT.Now let’s address the unbearable plot. This whole book is based around the ridiculous premise that Louisa is trying to find a way to “save” Will by giving him a reason to live. It’s essentially 369 pages of Louisa, an able bodied person, who decides that SHE knows when a disabled person is ready to die. Only to “learn” that she doesn’t have the right to make that decision and he’s just gonna die anyway. So you’re left reading a book that can only have one possible ending. If this was supposed to be a story about Louisa learning that she was wrong… shouldn’t the reader learn with her? Because you don’t.You know from the very beginning exactly how the book is going to end. Talk about predictability.Also I will just briefly mention that while I do think that making a commentary on physician assisted suicide is important and it’s a topic that deserves discussion, I don’t think that this was the best or most productive way to go about it. Overall I think it did more harm than good to use it as a plot device in a book that’s marketed as a romance novel.Were you waiting for my thoughts on the ableism? Here you go.First off, as an able bodied person, I know my place and I’m not going to try to speak on behalf of anyone or pretend to know more about the issue than I do. That being said, I’m still going to call this book out for the ableist themes it perpetuates.The whole message of this book is that no matter what lengths someone goes for you, how much love, wealth, or support you have, living a disabled life is so unbearable that the only thing to do is to kill yourself. Do with that what you will, but nothing about that message is right or okay in my eyes.But again, I am speaking only from my perspective. So here are a couple of links to articles written by disabled people about their thoughts on the ableism in this book:Honestly the only thing about this book that made me cry was how painful it was to keep reading. I NEVER DNF books, yet I was SO close to putting this one down. But I just couldn’t do it because I wanted to be able to talk about it in its entirety.So there you have it. All of my thoughts on this wildly popular, well loved book. So much for going to see the movie.

Source: https://thangvi.com
Category: Thông tin

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